About Rick

(as of 2020-06-08)

Short-form Bio:

Dr. Richard Forno is a Senior Lecturer in the UMBC Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, where he directs the UMBC Graduate Cybersecurity Program and serves as the Assistant Director of UMBC’s Center for Cybersecurity. Prior to academia, his twenty-year career in operational cybersecurity spanned the government, military, and private sector in both technical and management roles, including helping build a formal cybersecurity program for the US House of Representatives, serving as the first Chief Security Officer for Network Solutions (then, the global center of the internet DNS system), consulting to Fortune 100 companies, and more. Dr. Forno’s research interests, rooted in both cybersecurity principles and the humanities, explore the relationships between technology, security, and society in areas including information age conflict, risk communication, resiliency, and the social shaping of technology within networked organizations. Dr. Forno holds degrees in international relations from American University and Salve Regina University, and is a graduate of Valley Forge Military College and the United States Naval War College. His doctoral research at Curtin University of Technology explored the complex nature of security informatics and risk communication.

Long-form Bio:

Dr. Richard Forno is a Senior Lecturer in the UMBC Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, where he directs the UMBC Graduate Cybersecurity Program, serves as the Assistant Director of UMBC’s Center for Cybersecurity, is a Junior Affiliate Scholar at the Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society (CIS). From 2005-2012 was a Visiting Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he served as a course instructor for the CERT Coordination Center (CERT/CC). Since 2005 he has provided occasional consulting and advisory services through KRvW Associates in Alexandria, VA.

Richard considers himself an unconventional, albeit realistic, critical thinker about the relationships between technology, security, and society. Within that broad conceptual and practical framework, his interdisciplinary research and professional interests include information age conflict (broadly defined), cybersecurity operations (especially incident handling), risk communication, resiliency, and the social shaping of technology within networked organizations.

Before academia, Richard’s twenty-year career includes helping build a formal cybersecurity program for the United States House of Representatives and serving as the first Chief Security Officer at Network Solutions (then, the global center of the internet DNS system), and consulting for the Department of Defense and Fortune 500 companies. He has worked with all levels of management at government, military and commercial clients on technical and non-technical projects pertaining to information operations, cybersecurity, technology test & evaluation, and critical infrastructure protection. From 2000-2004, he was co-founder & CTO to various consulting startups.

Both a technologist and student of national security studies, Richard has a strong interest in the influence of technology upon national security. Along those lines, in 1999, he co-founded one of the most prominent private open source intelligence networks used by the US national security community (featured in the Marine Corps Gazette and The Atlantic) and in 2006, co-founded the Senior Information Operations Advisory Council to network national security thought leaders in supporting the exploration of sound information operations, influence, strategic communications doctrine, analysis and application. He is a Life Member of the National Military Intelligence Association and previously served as President of the NMIA Potomac Chapter.

In 2001, Richard delivered American University’s first modern course on information security and conducted regular guest lectures on information warfare and infrastructure protection at the National Defense University in Washington, DC from 2001-2003. He was a founding member of the Academic Advisory Board for Northern Virginia Community College’s Information Security Program and participated in the 2000 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Information Security Education Research Project. He also serves on the advisory boards of Secure Network Systems (2008-2015) and BlindHash (2015-).

Richard continues to speak frequently at government, industry, academic symposia, and to the global media. Along with several articles and papers written over the years, he is the co-author of O’Reilly’s Incident Response (2001). Additionally, he contributed chapters to the books Cyberwar 2.0: Myths, Mysteries and Realities (1998), Inventing Arguments (2005), and The Edinburgh Companion to Political Realism (2018). Since 2006, he has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Information Technology & Politics. Richard’s public outreach is marked by a committment to understandability across audiences and experience levels – accomplished by mixing his love of technology and background in the humanities to develop and deliver common sensical and outside-the-box perspectives on assorted technology & security topics.

Richard holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in international relations from American University and Salve Regina University, and is a graduate of Valley Forge Military College and the United States Naval War College. His doctoral research at Curtin University of Technology explored the complex nature of security informatics and risk communication within internet-based communities of practice.

In his spare time, Richard enjoys working out, tennis, SCUBA diving, investing matters, and consuming fine coffee, kabobs, and sushi (though not at the same time.)